Leftovers by Aditi Ramesh

By Sharath Krishnaswami on 12/12/2019 at 10:52 pm

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Leftovers by Aditi Ramesh
Leftovers Aditi Ramesh
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Tracklist
  • Folders
  • Don't Be Rude
  • Origin
  • Outro

In an interview with Arul Kale in astray.in Aditi Ramesh says, “I was amazed; I didn’t believe the kind of stuff I was writing, the kind of stuff I was playing live, the way I was able to articulate things. Now, with building a larger ensemble, you need to be able to communicate how you’re feeling, what your ideas are to a lot more musicians and they need to be on the same page and everything needs to be cohesive.” In pursuit of this cohesiveness, Aditi embarks on her second EP Leftovers after Autocorrect which released last year.

Leftovers begins with ‘Origin’, a possible ode to the evolution of her style of music. Fusion would be a loosely held term to identify her style, because it is a conglomeration of diverse genres, each running off in its own merit only to be drawn into the strength of her voice, which blends seamlessly from funk to Carnatic.

Origins’ breaks into Muthuswami Dikshitar’s Natai raga accompanied by her band which comprises guitarist Anthony Cammarota, drummer Ishan Jadwani and bassist Bijit Bhattacharya. It would be safe to say, that the beginning of any pathbreaking genre is composed of experiments. This EP appears to be one such experiment.

Folders’ begins with Aditi on the keyboard. The first few notes seem jazzy until Aditi’s crisp voice cuts into the calming tones on the guitar and a lazy percussion. It later escalates into a scramble of Carnatic and hip hop. However, turning around the Indie scene and making it question where it stands.

One other artist that I could draw an uneven parallel to was Bindu Subramaniam and her Thayir Sadam Project. But with a snippet of ‘Dont Re Rude’, Aditi eases into a relatable refrain, jazz forming the overwhelming component.

In the fourth song of her EP, Aditi falls back to her Carnatic roots. In a world where people rehash old music to make new, one can only hope that such music lasts the test of time.

Sharath Krishnaswami

About Sharath Krishnaswami

Sharath is a freelance journalist. When he's not working, he's either painting on walls, trekking, or writing short stories.

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