Tag Archives: Lucky Ali

Lucky Ali at Blue Frog, Bangalore

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Mahendra Patnaik

Mahendra Patnaik is a software engineer by profession and a freelance photographer based out of Bangalore. He loves cooking and playing various sports.

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Bacardi NH7 Weekender Date, Ticket, Lineup and Venue Details

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Pune

Date: Oct 18-20
Venue: Laxmi Lawns, Next to Magarpatta City
Line Up:
Ankur Tewari, BLOT vs. Kohra, Blackstratblues, Chase & Status DJ Set, Devoid, Donn Bhat + Passenger Revelator, Dualist Inquiry, Indian Ocean, Karsh Kale Collective + NH7 All Stars, Krunk All-Stars, Maati Baani, Midival Punditz (Live), Nischay Parekh, Nucleya, Papon & The East India Company, Parvaaz, Pentagram, Prateek Kuhad Collective, Scribe, Shankar Tucker, Simian Mobile Disco, Skindred, Sky Rabbit, Slow Club, Suman Sridhar feat. Jiver, Textures, The Raghu Dixit Project, Vachan Chinappa, Vir Das’ Alien Chutney, Your Chin

Bangalore

Date: Nov 23, 24
Venue: Embassy International Riding School
Line Up:
Dry the River, Kailasa, Lucky Ali, Mekaal Hasan Band, The Manganiyar Seduction by Roysten Abel, The Raghu Dixit Project, Krunk All-Stars, Noisia, Nucleya, Rob Garza (Thievery Corporation) Solo DJ set, Shaa’ir + Func, And So I Watch You from Afar, Bevar Sea, Inner Sanctum, Karsh Kale Collective + NH7 All Stars, TesseracT, The Fender Benders, Nischay Parekh, Prateek Kuhad, Sulk Station, Zervas & Pepper, Bobby Friction, Cali P & Chiqui Dubs, Dakta Dub, DJ Uri, EZ Riser, Low Rhyderz, Pippin, Poirier, Reggae Rajahs, Sound Avtar, _RHL

Delhi, NCR

Date: Nov 30, Dec 1
Venue: Buddh International Circuit, Greater Noida
Line Up:
Chic feat. Nile Rodgers, Dry the River, Faridkot, Kailasa, Lucky Ali, Mekaal Hasan Band, Noori, Benga, Kill Paris, Michal Menert, Nucleya, Sandunes, Shiva Soundsystem, And So I Watch You from Afar, J.Viewz, Karsh Kale Collective + NH7 All Stars, Meshuggah, MUTEMATH, Scribe, SundogProject, The Ska Vengers, Arooj Aftab, Dhruv Visvanath, Nischay Parekh, Prateek Kuhad Collective, Rajasthan Roots, Zervas & Pepper, Baba Jas, Dubtron, Frame/Frame, Moniker, Soundclash, Swaggamuffin, Tarqeeb, The Grind, The Heatwave, YT, Ziggy the Blunt

Kolkata

Date: Dec 14,15
Venue: Ibiza Resort, Merlin Greens
Line Up:
Indian Ocean, Kailasa, Papon & The East India Company, PINKNOISE, Soulmate, Swarathma, The Raghu Dixit Project, Arjun Vagale presents Re:Focus, Bay Beat Collective, BLOT vs. Kohra, Dualist Inquiry Band, Michal Menert, Nucleya, The Ska Vengers, Demonic Resurrection, Digital Suicide, Ganesh Talkies, Karsh Kale Collective + NH7 All Stars, Parikrama, Pentagram, Textures, Undying Inc, Zero, Girish Pradhan, Nischay Parekh, Prateek Kuhad, Tajdar Junaid, Vir Das’ Alien Chutney, AlgoRhythm, BASSFoundation, David Boomah, Delhi Sultanate and Begum X, DJ Uri, EZ Riser, Reggae Rajahs, Sandunes, Smoke Signal, Sound Avtar, Yidam

Ticket Details:
Community Ticket: Rs 3000 The Community ticket is a three-day ticket available to anyone who has purchased tickets to any of our festivals (Bacardi NH7 Weekender, A Summer’s Day or Invasion), or is a registered user on NH7.in
Regular Ticket: Rs 3750 Valid for all three days
Under-21 Ticket: Rs 1750 (You qualify if you were born after Oct 1, 1992)

BACARDI NH7 WEEKENDER WARRIOR
Pune + Bangalore : Rs 4500
Pune + Delhi : Rs 4500
Pune + Kolkata : Rs 4500
All Four Cities: Rs 6000. Buy tickets for 3 cities and get the 4th free. Not transferable.

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Lucky Ali at The Jazz Theatre, Windmills Craftworks

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Rohan Arthur

Rohan Arthur is a Photographer + Writer at What's the Scene who enjoys all music that does not involve growling/vomiting into the microphone. Rohan is the vocalist of a blues rock band and also manages another folk rock band. At every given chance, he runs away to the jungles, which he believes are his home.

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Lucky Ali at Hard Rock Cafe, Hyderabad

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Trinadh Rakesh

Trinadh Rakesh believes photography is a way of capturing life’s various reflections, which is why he loves to experiment in different genres. His effort is to tell a story with every moment that he captures!

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Lucky Ali at Hard Rock Cafe, Bangalore

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Dev Ambardekar

Dev is a music photographer based out of Bangalore. He has been documenting the music scene actively for almost two years during which he has shot several Indian bands and a handful international acts. His expertise ranges from multi-day music festivals to pub shows. While he is not behind the camera, Dev is an Architect and occasional writer. You can follow him at @DevAmbardekar.

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Interview with Rzhude David

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Rudy David aka Rzhude is a Bangalore-based singer-songwriter, studio owner, sound engineer and producer. He is also a founder member of Thermal And A Quarter (TAAQ) with numerous singles, albums and tours to his credit. Currently, he’s a session bass player for Dr. L Subramaniam Global Fusion Group, Lucky Ali, The Raghu Dixit Project among other fusion and rock groups.

WTS: If someone were to give you an unlimited budget, what bass gear would you buy and why?

Rzhude: Well, once the stuff between your ears and your fingers are practiced, then the next point is the instrument. In an unlimited situation, I’d get the NS Design CR Series 4-String Electric Double Bass and the Warwick Infinity Bass Neck-Through 5-String. Sure there are more expensive made to order possibilities but these are off the rack instruments that make the grade quite nicely. SWR Classic Series SM-1500 1500W Bass Amp Head, SWR Goliath Senior IV 6X10 Bass Speaker Cabinet for amplification duties.

Once the signal leaves the guitar, I’d want a really good cable. I’m not so hot on active pickups, but what I really like is passive pick-ups with an active EQ. I’m not into fx processors either but the Eden WTDI World Tour Direct Box and Bass Preamp and the Roland VB-99 V-Bass System could be thrown in for fun.

WTS: What would u prefer – 4/5/6-string?

Rzhude: For me it’s the middle path again, the 5-string completes the range for me. I’m not so much of a high solo-ing kind of a person, I’m a groove-oriented bass player. It’s more like it opens up enough positions using that 5th string itself. For a time, when I started out, probably 12 years back, when I switched from 4 to 5, it took some getting used to. The B string turned out to be a nice place to rest your thumb! Once you get used to it, then you find it pretty handy, although I know that there are some bass players, including a friend of mine who says “If you can’t play it with four, you can’t play it with more”.

WTS: Do you use a signature ‘tone’ for each song or each style of music? How do you get your tones, i.e. tweaking the amp/tweaking the EQ on the bass/using a pedal or all of the above?

Rzhude: If I’m doing session work then it depends on the song. I’d most likely set it up from my Bass pre-amp head and keep it set for the session. If I’m going into a recording situation, with a ‘post effects’ scenario, I go cleaner from the amp and if required, tweak the tone and add fx at the mixing stage. But live its usually just one tone because once I’m set with the sound I like, I don’t fiddle with the amp – I might just move finger position from the bridge to the neck and maybe the mid frequencies. I flip the pick-up mix for soloing and boost the mids a notch with a parametric EQ.

WTS: Do you think a basic knowledge of sound engineering is a requisite when you set up for a gig, or can one get away by going with “what sounds best”?

Rzhude: It’s useful to know these things but I don’t think it’s essential. It will help to know what a sound person has to deal with – that is the most important job at a live gig and high-pressure as it gets. If you’re used to a sound engineer then he knows what you want so you get a good mix of everything coming back to you and it helps to know what’s going on out there and not be unrealistic about your sound demands. I think “what sounds best” is best left to a sound engineer (or two!). Because there’s one doing your front of house mix, which you aren’t going to be able to hear anyway, and there’s one doing your monitor mix which is really crucial to you. My tone I get from the amp and the instrument EQ and the level of the amp should be set according the balance coming off stage and that’s a call for the FOH engineer directly and not as loud as most guitar players want it (you can have more on your monitors!)

WTS: In your opinion, what does it take for a band to make it big in today’s scenario? Also, how do manage to keep things together for a long enough time, like TAAQ?

Rzhude: It means working out your differences and sticking together for what makes sense to you – the music and the right reasons. Keeping a band together is not an easy thing to do – first of all, even getting a band together is not a simple task. There are different definitions of success – I know bands that have been together for 20 years and are quite happy being as they are, not really bothered about who thinks what of their music, or even if anyone is listening to them. They’re probably happy to just meet up now and then and have fun playing their own stuff! If you look at a different context, where it has to make commercial sense to you, then you have to look at what kind of music you plan to play, who your target audience is and how you plan to reach them.

The 11 odd years with TAAQ involved a LOT of practice. What it does give you is chops a-plenty, you have time to work things out with guys who will accommodate you, as opposed to coming in ‘fresh’ to a session, where you have a few hours to work out a set-list. Keeping a band together means working out your personal and musical differences. The joy of being in a band itself is the camaraderie, sharing more than just music with the guys – sharing personal ups and downs. You have to take your songs out in the open in any live format. You have to grow your audience, and the only way to do that is to play, play and play. And once you break through the idea and glamour of ‘being a rockstar’ you realize it isn’t so, and it involves a lot of hard work.

On another note, in today scenario with the kind of recording gear and software we have, it’s much easier to put down your sound and cut a demo than it was, say 10 years ago. A lot of new bands get noticed this way – put up your music and a video on YouTube, if you get a couple of lakh hits, then you get more and more gigs and can command your price for the next gig!

There’s nothing like actually going out and finding that feeling of playing – you are entertaining and more than anything else if you can focus on expressing yourself with this sound and being a part of a group – that’s important and a lot of people forget that. If you are able to get into that zone where you just connect with your instrument and the music and each note at your finger- that is the zone you want to be in, like a meditative state of music. That’s what I look for now, getting into that zone and simply playing the moment.

WTS: How important is sight reading in today’s music scene?

Rzhude: Again, it depends on the kind of music you are playing and the group you are playing it with. For the most part it’s not that important, especially if you are just starting out, you could get away with knowing some theory without knowing how to read or write it. But at some point of time it does come across as the base of music itself, because it is a universal language. For a long time, the only way I could get my music out was by playing the guitar or using a recorder. If you look at any ‘literate’ musician, they don’t need an instrument. When you do that formal education, what it does for you is make you aware of a lot more than just your instrument and you can immediately start writing out different sections on your own.

But over the last few years, using technology like ProTools and Sibelius, I’ve been able to notate much faster – the computer takes that learning curve from you and does a lot of the memory work. I would say it is very important if you are getting serious about your music, if you want to just have fun, then you let the music play you.

WTS: Which artists and bands have had the most significant influence on your playing?

Rzhude: I’d say my single biggest influence, as a singer-songwriter would be James Taylor. Back in the late 80sI was completely floored by his ability to sing and write those songs and amazing production of albums like Never Die Young and Hourglass in the 90s. If I had to list them out, I’d say – James Taylor, The Beatles, Sting and Steely Dan. Today it’s much wider with singers like Abida Parveen and Dhafer Youssuf in the fray on my playlists. As a genre of music, I’m more into acoustic folk. Indian folk music, which is something I grew up listening to, has also had a big influence. As a bass player I haven’t been influenced by anyone in particular.

WTS: Which is your favourite genre for bass playing and why?

Rzhude: I’ve been playing all kinds of music, but now I prefer what you would call ‘fusion’ music. I’ve always had an inclination towards Indian (Carnatic) music which I’ve studied enough to be able to translate some of that learning into my guitar playing and from that onto my bass playing.

‘Fusion’ is such a huge space with so much to do! With this genre of music, if you are lucky you will meet maybe just once before a gig, and most likely you’ll be really working it out on stage. A lot of it is very spontaneous and that is what I like now- because you have no choice but to go into that zone where you really connect with your instrument and the musicians that you are working with. It’s like jazz, in that you have a standard format, but then you count on your musicianship to be able to break that open and make something new out of it.

WTS: Are you a bass player who composes or a composer who plays bass?

Rzhude: The myth to be busted here is that I’m known as a bass player because I’ve been associated with the instrument in a band for many years and although I completely love playing the bass, I see myself as being much broader than a bass player.

So I’d have to say the latter, because I’ve been composing since I was in school, and the way I took up bass was by default – I went to listen to a band in Chennai called Grasshopper Green, where a friend of mine was the bass player, he stopped coming soon after, and his bass was just lying there. So I was asked to play, and had fun playing the instrument, after which these guys said “Hold on to it, keep playing!” So I’d say bass is something I play because of the experience that I’ve had playing it.

My only influence as a bass player would probably be Keith Peters, since he was the bass player in my acoustic band back in 1994!

WTS: The question everyone is asking – why did you break away from TAAQ?

Rzhude: 11 years with one band was about as much as I could take, which was restrictive in the sense that I have a lot more than just one type of music to do. From both the band’s perspective and mine, it made sense – it got to be a lot more serious along the way, and fun is where it stopped for me. Personally I didn’t enjoy playing the pub-scene any more, and those were the main ‘bread and butter’ kind of gigs we were dragging ass around for. Besides, I had also crossed a certain age barrier, where I’d decided on more time for my personal life. It’s been a good thing for me and I know the band will move in a new direction too. I’m still open to session playing with TAAQ – which has happened happily enough on more than one occasion.

WTS: What are the current projects you are working on/involved in?

Rzhude: I’ve been associated more recently with artists like Dr. L Subramaniam and Kavita Krishnamurthy among a host of other great musicians in the Indian Music and Fusion scene. In the last 2 years I’ve played some of the best gigs in my life – touring places like Brazil, Africa and Europe. Besides this, I’ve been active as a producer and engineer – doing a wide variety of albums and demos across different styles and aesthetic. I run my own project studio here in Bangalore with a niche Brand and Sound Identity design service that I’m enjoying. I’m involved in projects that involve Music Education, technology, retail and production – so I’m keeping the mix busy and open to new possibilities.

WTS: What have been the major highlights in your musical career till date?

Rzhude: My first album – produced by Paul Jacob and John Anthony in Chennai 1994 – recorded on 16 track tape. Sharing stage with Deep Purple and Jethro Tull. The last album with TAAQ produced at A.R Rahman’s AM studios with Jeff Peters on the mix – this is as good as it gets anywhere in the world. Also, setting up my own studio and producing music for both TAAQ and other artists since and touring Brazil and Europe.

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Lucky Ali and Bhramm, Live at Ishanya Mall, Pune

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Cheena Kapoor

Born and raised in New Delhi, Cheena Kapoor has always been inclined towards adventures and believes all-around development is more important than academic growth. It is this nature of her that drew her interest in photography. According to her, a good photograph can seal a moment forever.

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Mihir Joshi’s The Bombay Rock Project at Inorbit Mall, Mumbai

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The Bombay Rock Project, although being a new entrant into Mumbai’s music scene, comprises a line-up of musicians who are well established in their own right, each of whom plays for a number of city bands. The gig they were playing today was at a mall, and I didn’t really know what to expect from them in terms of music, or the venue’s sound setup.

It was a typically windy and rainy June evening in Vashi, as the band set themselves up in the Inorbit Mall compound, close to the entrance. The place was sheltered by an unusually psychedelic looking ceiling way above, and kept out most of the rain. There was a sparse crowd present, as you’d expect in a mall, most of who were either known to the band, or curious passers-by.

A quick chat with one of the band members told me that I was to expect covers of classic Bollywood songs, with a twist, and maybe a couple of English songs thrown in as well. This surprised me, given the kind of music that I’ve heard each of these musicians play before with other bands.

So finally after a long drawn out sound check, the band was good to go. On lead guitar was Sanju Aguiar of Devoid, on bass was Ishaan Krishna of The Hoodwink Circle, on drums was Agnnelo Picaardo of Dischordian, on keyboards and saxophone was Nigel Rajaratnam of Dischordian, and spearheading the project was The Works’ vocalist, Mihir Joshi.

The first song was an upbeat cover of the title track of the Amitabh Bacchan starrer, Don, and set the stage for an energetic set list. The next was a cover of ‘Janu Meri Jaan’, from the 1980 classic, Shaan. At this point, I must admit I didn’t quite know what to make of the band. It felt a little bit indulgent, and more like they were playing to the masses, and not to a more discerning audience.

The band seemed tight and the overall sound was fairly good, given the windy conditions and that the location was for all practical purposes, a driveway. Ishaan had broken the top string of his bass guitar at the end of the second song, but to everyone’s bewilderment, nonchalantly proceeded to continue without it.

The next one was a rather crowd-pleasing mash-up medley of ‘Summer of ’69’, ‘Sweet Child o’ Mine’, and ‘Where The Streets Have No Name’. The songs were blended together quite well, but essentially stayed true to the originals. This was followed by another two hindi covers of the songs ‘Dekha Na’ and ‘Jawani Janeman’. So far, I had no complaints about the performance itself, but given the set list, it felt a little like we were watching an Amitabh Bacchan tribute gig.

Things started picking up with the next song, an interesting jazz-like cover of  ‘Dum Maaro Dum’ with a nice drum solo from Agnnelo and a piano solo by Nigel. Things got even more interesting with a reggae mash-up of John Mayer’s ‘Your Body Is A WonderLand’ and Lucky Ali’s ‘O Sanam’, scoring highly on the creativity scale.

The next two songs were covers of ‘Saara Zamaana’ and ‘Aap Jaisa Koi’, both of which had a distinct classic rock feel to them, and were followed by ‘Inteha Ho Gayi’ (yet again featuring the Big B) and was for me the best song so far, with Nigel switching to the saxophone towards the end.

Tossing in another English track, the band did an unusual take on the David Guetta house sensation, ‘Love Is Gone’, before moving back into hindi mode with a cover of the title track of the movie ‘Rock On’ as Mihir went into the crowd and got people to sing along with the chorus.

In response to the crowd’s request for another fast song, Mihir belted out ‘Dance Dance’, probably not my favourite of the evening, but there was a lot of energy in the performance, and some nice guitaring by Sanju. The list concluded with ‘Om Shanti Om’ and a cover of Deep Purple’s ‘Smoke On The Water’.

The performance overall was very entertaining. Agnnelo was solid as ever on drums, Nigel was creative with his keyboard, Ishaan was quite flawless despite playing with only three strings, and Sanju’s guitar riffs were excellent. Mihir was clearly the life of the band and though his vocals were at times a little bit pitchy, more than made up for it with some incredible showmanship and stage presence.

I’ve always found it interesting to see the name of a band qualified with the word ‘Project’. It indicates a certain lack of pretence, a degree of experimentation, and to some extent, an organised approach, all of which, The Bombay Rock Project at first glance seemed to fulfill in fair measure.

The band appears to be well prepared to take on the music scene. Their costumes and logo look to be steps towards creating a solid identity. Their performance looked tight and well rehearsed, and the members appeared relaxed and were enjoying themselves. The musicianship was of excellent quality and had a balanced sound. All in all, they appear to be unabashedly, a hindi cover band, and clearly look to be taking the commercial route by introducing rock music to the masses.

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Lucky – No Time for Love

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I attended the UB City gig last evening after Junkyard Groove posted the gig details on their facebook page. I shall now narrate my observations after having walked out of the concert.

My long head strong belief that Power Metal gigs are the worst gigs was disproved- an acoustic open air gig in any genre is the worst gig idea ever. I mean, there is no bonfire. There is no wine. We are not 10 friends, a guitarist and a vocalist. This is a 1000 people strong open-air gig for eff’s sake. Fire up them speakers up and take out those damn electric guitars. No Karaoke, please. This is not Japan.

If you still want to do an Unplugged gig, get a room. I mean, seriously. The birds chirp louder than the sound of acoustic guitar in open air. You cannot conduct an acoustic gig in an open air theater in UB City amidst the noise of M.G Road traffic. It’s as impossible as making Leonard Cohen cover Sex Pistols.

If you are planning to conduct one despite it all- warn us in advance. Tweet. Facebook. Text. You have your options. I got duped by the organizers into believing that it was a gonna be a great gig. It was great until JYG were playing. They were almost booed off stage by Lucky Ali fans (999 of them). Ameeth sensing the boredom and hostility in the gathered crowd jokingly declared he’d be torturing them with two more songs and they’d folk off the stage. 999 of them heard him say ‘f**k off the stage.’

Bollywood doesn’t go well with Indie music. JYG are Rock n’ Roll. They are the most amazing band to come out of India in the past decade. The crowd showed no respect to this amazing band that makes great music and provides it for free. The day when people understand the ‘if I don’t get it I should STFU’ concept will be the day I’ll stop downloading music off of the internet.

Lucky Ali is a good singer. Respect. But he’s a terribly boring person when it comes to after-a-song on-stage banter. I don’t want someone telling me Valentine’s Day shouldn’t be celebrated just on 14th Feb but the entire year. I mean, dude! He also went on how he saw an UFO while he was having a smoke and how his bandmate was amused by the flickering light in the night sky. He sounded so much like my grandpa!

If you don’t appreciate something get the eff out. And that’s what I did. Acoustic gig on a windy evening, amidst douchebags of the highest order, listening to Bangalore traffic and amazingly idiotic stage lights that were aimed directly at the audience is not my idea of a Sunday evening gig.

The Italian restaurant at the end of the Amphitheater is terrific, you guys.

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