Tag Archives: Siddharth Basrur

Bacardi NH7 Weekender 2015 – Shillong

Share

Abhilash Baishya

Abhilash Baishya, a 19 year old student from Guwahati is an aspiring Engineer and a hobbyist photographer. He's a movie buff and loves music.

Comment

#2StrokeTour Episode 2 ft. Ganesh Talkies & Last Remaining Light at Terra Mayaa, Guwahati

Share

Abhilash Baishya

Abhilash Baishya, a 19 year old student from Guwahati is an aspiring Engineer and a hobbyist photographer. He's a movie buff and loves music.

Comment

2Stroketour Ep 2 ft. Last Remaining Light, The Ganesh Talkies and Superfuzz at Antisocial, New Delhi

Share

Manish Jaju

Manish is a New Delhi based photographer and shoots weddings, lifestyle, travel and other events. He also has a keen interest in street photography that drives him to pursue several ongoing personal projects.

Comment

Indie Earth at The Park, Chennai feat. Siddharth Basrur and Your Chin

Share
Comment

Slain releases latest single ‘Firesea’

Share

Bangalore-based progressive-rock band Slain has released their latest single titled ‘Firesea‘. The song features Siddharth Basrur of Goddess Gagged fame on vocals and Slain’s 17-piece-choir, The Choral Riff.

The lyrics of the song have been written by Manek D’Silva and Naresh Nathan, and the music was composed by Bryden Lewis, Jonathan Wesley, Manek D’Silva and Naresh Nathan. “The idea was to bring in someone as a guest and we figured someone who could do justice to a punchy track like this would be Sid Basrur, as he is one of Ranjit’s favorites as well. The unique blend of his vocals and the choir all add to something that sounds really big and brings about a rather epic sonic experience. The lyric video was done by Manek D’silva, wanting a very simple lyric video and allowing the song to speak for itself.” says bassist Naresh Nathan.

Interestingly, Bryden Lewis first thought of this song back in college when it was performed differently with another band. Bryden approached his current band-members Naresh and Manek to rework the song entirely. “I wanted the song to be inspirational, with a never-give-up kinda feel to it because life can be a test! There are a couple of more singles that will follow. We aren’t releasing an album yet. Our music is evolving with the change in lineup and this is the first original that we’re releasing with the new lineup,” says Bryden.

The track has been mixed and mastered by Keshav Dhar, of Illusion Audio and Skyharbor.
Lead Vocal Recording has been done by Ayan De at Midicore Studios, Mumbai and editing by Hriday Goswami.

Comment

The Siddharth Basrur Project at Blue Frog, Mumbai

Share
Avatar photo

Jeffy John

Jeffy is 'that metalhead with the beard' at a concert you've been to. Anywhere. He makes sure our PR needs are fed, watered and burped. Well.

Comment

Rhythm Method at The Bflat Bar, Bangalore

Share
Avatar photo

Robin George Thomas

Robin George Thomas is a photographer from Bangalore. He likes to wear white socks. He will only wear white socks. He cant remember the last time he wore a pair of socks that weren't White.

Comment

The Jack Daniels Rock Awards 2013

Share

 

 

 

The eighth edition of the annual Jack Daniels Rock awards was held on the 22nd of February at Mehboob Studio amidst little hype and no fanfare. The invite-only event hosted by Sameer Malhotra and The P-Man (Rohit Pereira) saw successful rock bands from the scene, across genres, being feted for their musical efforts over the past one year, by people who had little or nothing to do with the scene.

Bombay punk rockers, Blek kick-started the evening performing songs from their debut album, Hexes + Drama & Other Reasons for Evacuation to an audience of around 100 people. Their half hour long set included some of their popular songs like ‘Minus the Makeup’ and ‘Fog + Strobe’ which was also nominated in the best song category. Blek’s set was followed by the first set of awards which saw Shantanu Hudalikar win the best producer award. Advaita’s The Silent Sea and Swarathma’s Topiwalleh shared honours for the best album art while The Blue Frog, Mumbai was adjudged the best live music venue.  The emcee then made Michele Obama’s virtual presence at the Oscars seem less random by calling upon a Bollywood designer along with an eye-candy model to give away the next set of awards – Blek were back on stage to collect their award, after being declared the best emerging band of 2012. The next award handed out was for the best keyboardist which was shared by Jason Zachariah (Jason Zac Band) and Zubin Balaporia (Indus Creed). The designer-model duo then gave a priceless tip of advice in fashion to the musicians gathered (who, judging by the vibes, couldn’t care less), before handing over the best drummer award to Jai Row Kavi (Indus Creed). Bombay Jam band Something Relevant was up next on stage, playing a half hour long medley of songs from their second album, We Could Be Dreaming which was released last year.

Actor Suchitra Pillai was then accompanied on stage by Ken Ghosh (Bollywood director) to give away the next set of awards – Tony Guinard of the Ska Vengers tipped my personal favourite Roop Thomas of Blakc to win the best bassist award. Thermal and a Quarter frontman Bruce Lee Mani deservingly bagged the coveted best guitarist award, having being nominated alongside other stalwarts like Keshav Dhar, Baiju Dharmarajan and Mahesh Tinaikar. A clueless Mandira Bedi then walked onto stage to hand over the awards for best male and female vocalists – Vivienne Pocha won the award for the best female vocalist scoring over equally good singers Samara C (Ska Vengers) and Suman Sridhar (Sridhar/Thayil), while Angaraag “Papon” Mahanta overpowered the likes of Uday Benegal, Rabbi Shergill, Bruce Lee Mani, Gareth D’mello and Vasu Dixit in a star studded list of nominations for the best male vocalist.

The Rolling Stone all-star jam that followed, showcased artists from bands like Something Relevant, Split, Goddess Gagged and Colour Compound, recreate the magic of some of India’s most popular rock songs  – from Siddharth Basrur and Gareth D’mello’s duet take on Them Clones’s ‘Zephyretta’  to Rachel Varghese’s cover of Junkyard Groove’s ‘Imagine’, Saba Azad’s cover of  Orange Street’s ‘Candywalk’ to  Gareth’s beautiful delivery of ‘Lucy’ by Zero, Suman Sridhar’s horror screams and deafening screeches on Workshop’s ‘Pudhe Sarka’ to Rachel Varghese’s rendering of ‘Trapped’ by Indus Creed,  the wonderfully selected set list for the jam had something for everyone’s taste and gave the attendees a lot to cheer about.

The Rolling Stone jam session was ensued by the last set of awards that saw Keshav Dhar’s Skyharbor bag the recently introduced – best metal band award before Papon made it two for the night after ‘Boitha Maro Re’ was adjudicated the best song, overshadowing some splendid tracks like ‘Maeva’ (Skyharbor), ‘Fog + Strobe’ (Blek), ‘Dissolve’ (Indus Creed) and ‘For the Cat’ (TAAQ). Former Miss India, Yukta Mookhey was then called out of oblivion to hand over the last couple of awards – Advaita’s ‘The Silent Sea’ won the top honours bagging the best album award, however it was Indus Creed who won the bragging rights and took home the 5 lakh rupees prize money after being adjudged the best Indian band for the year 2012.

Despite oddities of the award presenters, a no-show by most winners and a kitty cat on the loose, the award show at large went off smoothly, thanks (largely) to the free flowing Jack at the event.

Comment

Two Night : Max Clouth Trio and Bones For Bertie at The Blue Frog, Mumbai

Share

 

 

 

The rather clichéd title of Two Night somehow made me feel like I was heading for a grind-house kung-fu double-feature. I’d never heard either of the featured bands before and I hoped to be pleasantly surprised.

The introduction to the Max Clouth Trio that I’d glanced at on the Blue Frog’s event page was interesting to say the least. The lineup was formidable and highly accomplished, with the widely respected Karl Peters on bass, the very accomplished and experienced jazz musician Benny Soans on drums, and Max Clouth of course, on guitars, with a highly impressive resume at a relatively young age.

The gig began without much ado, and at a fairly decent time for a change. Each of them was somehow dressed completely out of sync with the others; Max Clouth in a shirt and trouser, Karl Peters in a t-shirt, track pants and a cap, and Benny Soans in a long, red bohemian tshirt and jeans.

Max started out on the electric guitar, and the band got into a nice rhythm playing some fine up-tempo blues. It was soon clear why Karl Peters was so highly regarded as, as they played two of his compositions. The bass lines were sublime and complimented Max extremely well, while he led the way, and Benny Soans on drums was solid as ever without being extravagant.

Max’s double acoustic guitar was a curious looking instrument (and for some reason also looked a little DIY). Its tone however, was mesmerizing. The trio went into a jam frequently which was an absolute treat to the ears. One of the songs they played was even based on a Hindustani classical raga, as Max indicated.

Although their music very clearly had a voice of its own, the fact that theirs was an entirely instrumental set meant that the songs seemed to blend in to each other at times. A little more engagement of the crowd by Max between songs might have covered that angle a little bit better. Nonetheless, the set ended with a heavier song that included some fantastic blues guitar riffs and was for me, the best of the night. The last ten minutes consisted of the trio going into another jam, and capping it off with a suitably big finish.

The second half of Two Night featured another band that I’d never seen before. I’d ventured outside the venue for some quick socializing during the changeover, and the guys from Bones For Bertie were already on their way when I re-entered. I hung back for a bit to get a sense of what they were playing, and I liked it.

They looked to me like a tight four-piece outfit; comfortable, in sync with each other and driven by some of the best vocals that I’d heard at Blue Frog in a while, courtesy Siddharth Basrur . On lead guitar and keys was Ayan De, with new additions Shantanu Basrur (yes, the two Basrurs are cousins) and Suraj Manik on drums and bass respectively.

The mellow ‘As it Was’, was introduced by Siddharth as being the first he’d ever written, following it up with another called ‘The Road’. But the point where I really sat up and began to pay attention was on the next song, a heavier number with dark lyrical content, called ‘Letters to a Father’, penned by Ayan. Interestingly enough, the demo of the same song that’s available to stream off the band’s bandcamp page, is vastly different and stripped down, and is definitely worth a listen.

There was a certain maturity and inherent appeal in their sound and it was evident that the crowd was getting increasingly involved. Ayan’s first-ever written song ‘Picture Frames’ was next. The composition was sublime with guest vocalist Namaah Kumar completing the acoustic arrangement, and her smooth high-pitched vocals complementing Siddharth’s more rasping style extremely well.

After an interesting composition called ‘Again’, the band was joined on stage by a vocalist called Eden. I was a little surprised when Siddharth mentioned that they’d be taking on Adele’s ‘Rolling In The Deep’, but my aspersions were dispersed as soon as she began singing. The combination of smooth and throaty vocals once again sounded brilliant along with the piano accompaniment by Ayan, and as they merged in to Bruno Mars’ ‘Grenade’, the vociferous crowd made it very clear that they were floored!

Eden stayed on to sing a pleasant and simple self-written track, called ‘Eden’s Song’. Following this was ‘This Saturday’; a dark yet uplifting tune written for Ayan and Siddharth’s The Venus Project, with the duo playing keys and guitar respectively. Shantanu and Suraj got back on stage for the last two songs; a louder and heavier rock song called ‘Untitled’ (for the lack of a better name) and the upbeat ‘New Shoes’, (for everyone with a shoe fetish) to conclude a truly brilliant set.

All in all, Bones For Bertie scored tremendously well on a number of counts. Their performance was intense. The creativity in their arrangements was refreshing. And above all, their compositions underlined the fact that there really is no substitute for solid vocals, and great songwriting. A highly recommended listen!

Comment