Tag Archives: Take 5

Soundarya Jayachandran at Take 5, Bangalore

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Justin Jaideep Xavier

Justin Jaideep Xavier is an Automotive Design Engineer, Metal Head, Bullet, Beer & Old Monk Enthusiast, Dog Lover and Photographer. When he's not frequenting the regular watering holes over weekends he can be found shooting gigs and concerts in and around namma Bengaluru! You can check out more of his work on his website: www.JustinJaideep.in

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Girish And The Chronicles at Take 5, Bangalore

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Dev Ambardekar

Dev is a music photographer based out of Bangalore. He has been documenting the music scene actively for almost two years during which he has shot several Indian bands and a handful international acts. His expertise ranges from multi-day music festivals to pub shows. While he is not behind the camera, Dev is an Architect and occasional writer. You can follow him at @DevAmbardekar.

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Prakash Sontakke Band at Take 5, Bangalore

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Rohan Arthur

Rohan Arthur is a Photographer + Writer at What's the Scene who enjoys all music that does not involve growling/vomiting into the microphone. Rohan is the vocalist of a blues rock band and also manages another folk rock band. At every given chance, he runs away to the jungles, which he believes are his home.

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Traffic Jam at Tao Terraces, Bangalore

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On an especially cloud-covered Sunday evening, we waited for Traffic Jam to start their show. The venue was Tao Terraces at 1MG Mall in Bangalore – an open space sheathed by nothing but the sky, illuminated mostly by the moon.

As the band took the stage, they were greeted with lazy, but not unwelcome smiles. They started off with a light-hearted number titled ‘All That Jazz’. Some of you may remember it from the musical – Chicago. Traffic Jam’s adaptation was brilliantly refitted, with a no-frills vibe about it. The original flavor of the song wasn’t diluted thanks to the accompanying instruments, and one could hardly feel the lack of the trumpet, thanks to Marcus Daniel’s dexterous fingers, rasping away at the piano keys. Some were tapping their feet, some were bobbing their heads, and soon as the first song was over, they had everyone’s attention. There was applause, promptly followed by the next song – ‘What You Got’ – an original composition. Jessica Moorwood laughingly added that she probably shouldn’t have mentioned that. I, for one, was glad she did!

Traffic Jam at Tao Terraces, Bangalore

One of my favourite things about the gig was the neatness of it all. There was no 30-minute soundcheck while the audience waited, there was no Oscars-inspired speech between songs, and the conduct of the band engaged everyone without egregiousness. Their demeanour suited the ambience and it was almost like the music was a natural extension of the pale starlight and the wind.

Soon enough, Jessica announced that the song they were about to play had danceable tunes, if any couples were interested in that sort of thing. ‘A Day in the Life of a Fool’(aka ‘Black Orpheus’ aka ‘Mahna de Carnaval’) was playing. Traffic Jam’s take on the song wasn’t too mellow and it lasted a while longer than the original. The tempo was perfect thanks to Abhilash EK’s powerful subtlety with the drums. Breaks between the vocals and instrumental sections were placed at adequate lengths. The guitar solo rendered by Abhishek Prakash was followed by Marcus’s piano, in immediate succession. Sadly, nobody was dancing to this piece of classical legend and they would have had a long dance too!

Traffic Jam at Tao Terraces, Bangalore

This was remedied by their next song – another original titled ‘Lost Together’. Jessica dedicated it to her husband saying that it was written by him. It was a dreamy track with a tune and words that remind you of two lovers drifting into a world they made, unbeknownst to anyone else. Sure enough, there were couples dancing to this one. It’s the sort of song you’d associate with the phrase “Rainbows and Unicorns”, if you, like me, spend far too much time on the Internet for lack of other things to do!

The highlight of my evening was when I discovered to my pleasant surprise that their set list included Duke Ellington and Bob Russell’s ‘Don’t Get Around Much Anymore’.Traffic Jam’s rendition was upbeat, and if you wouldn’t pay attention to the lyrics, you’d hardly feel the shreds of sadness mixed with indifference. It signified age, but not in years. It signified youth, but not in words. An honest, straightforward cover that did no disservice to the original.

Traffic Jam at Tao Terraces, Bangalore

Keeping up with the deceptive cheerfulness, they played their next song – ‘Ain’t No Sunshine When She’s Gone’. I don’t know how Traffic Jam could pull off Duke Ellington and Bill Withers while making it seem effortless, but they did it. We’ve all heard several versions of this song and any jazz enthusiast would not resist or tire of new forms of its expression. Jessica’s vocals on this one would warrant even Eva Cassidy’s attention. Jefferson nuanced the performance in a wonderful way with his bass never dipping into the background. The soul of it all, however,was Abhishek’s solo, which was vivid and heartfelt. Nobody wanted the song to end, but end it did. Thankfully, it was only half their set time that was over.

After a well-deserved break, they returned with the instrumental– ‘Take 5’. “That’s my ringtone!” said the excited voice of my friend and colleague Rohan as he could barely stop himself from shaking a leg, much like most people at the venue.

Traffic Jam at Tao Terraces, Bangalore

The rest of their set included ‘Autumn Leaves’, ‘Son Of A Preacher Man’, ‘All Of Me’, and other songs. My [other] friend and colleague – Dev, remarked sometime during one of their songs that you can’t play the blues or jazz unless you really loved music. I nodded in agreement. It was quite telling of Traffic Jam then, that they packed a group of songs with their own flavour and kept adding on to it, without taking anything away.

Swati Nair

Swati is a writer/sub-editor for What'sTheScene. She enjoys most kinds of music and spends all of her time scouting the Internet and re-watching Star Trek and Swat Kats.

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Gerard Machado and Friends at Take 5

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Rohan Arthur

Rohan Arthur is a Photographer + Writer at What's the Scene who enjoys all music that does not involve growling/vomiting into the microphone. Rohan is the vocalist of a blues rock band and also manages another folk rock band. At every given chance, he runs away to the jungles, which he believes are his home.

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UNK: The Radha Thomas Ensemble at Take 5, Bangalore

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Rohan Arthur

Rohan Arthur is a Photographer + Writer at What's the Scene who enjoys all music that does not involve growling/vomiting into the microphone. Rohan is the vocalist of a blues rock band and also manages another folk rock band. At every given chance, he runs away to the jungles, which he believes are his home.

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Retronome at Take 5, Bangalore

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Aditya Vishwanathan

Aditya Vishwanathan is a creative photographer from Bangalore. After being actively involved with multiple bands in the music circuit, he now documents gigs in and around town. In his free time, he loves to play with kids while listening to an old Michael Jackson album.

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Steam at Take 5, Bangalore

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Rohan Arthur

Rohan Arthur is a Photographer + Writer at What's the Scene who enjoys all music that does not involve growling/vomiting into the microphone. Rohan is the vocalist of a blues rock band and also manages another folk rock band. At every given chance, he runs away to the jungles, which he believes are his home.

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Bangalore Venues Come Under Police ‘Notice’

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The recent talks doing the rounds about an imminent ban on live music in Bangalore city started when the local police slapped a notice on pubs and restaurants in the city that conduct live music performances. It all started when the local police stations received the notice (attached below) along with a list of ‘offenders’ , who needed to be served this notice. This happened in parallel in places all over the state. Local police stations in Bangalore have been serving the notice to offenders in their jurisdiction “ Zero-G and venues in far flung locations like Manipal (Blue Waters) were raided. In Indiranagar, venues like  Take 5, Xtreme Sports Bar , Cirrus, B Flat , Love Shack, Toit and The Beach were served the notice; all these venues are located around the 100 feet area , which has high visibility and traffic.

Our sources reveal that the cops, were heard telling some venue owners that this topic is ‘hot’ right now and the top brass is creating a lot of pressure on them to crack down and stop these locations from having live performances. In Love Shack, one person was charged with assault on a cop and had to cough up a hefty five figure fine. Cirrus was raided on 21st September, and also places like Pebble and Fuga. Last week , at Zero-G, 150 patrons were arrested for dancing , the DJ’s equipment were confiscated and not returned since. The crackdown seems to be directed towards dance-floor centric restaurants for having a strong correlation with their definition of ‘Dance Bar.’ The question is : when there is no dancing at venues like Take 5 or LOR , why are they supposed to quiet down?

 

The owner of a pub in Indiranagar says “Licenses allowing for live music exist, but the Licenses are given out to only 3-5 star restaurants/hotels (We have no data to support this). Its a fair thing to have a license to validate live music. We already have so many licenses for everything we sell, but at least provide some advance notice to owners to procure permissions.”

These problems can be voiced by bodies like the Pub Owners Association headed by Ashish (LOR) and Ananth (Fusion Lounge) by rousing the support of all the venue owners affected by the recent turn of events. This is exactly the kind of effect that can trickle down to the lives of so many people, because the former CM decided to replace the Police Commissioner with a man more suited to his orders.

A clear distinction is necessary to separate the dance bars from the myriad other places of amusement that do not come under this definition but suffer at the hands of the police. Once this distinction is made, prostitution can be dealt with at separate levels of intensity, assuming this is where the problem really stems from.

Translation of the letter:

” This letter is to inform you that it has come to our notice your bar & restaurant is using high intensity bright colored lighting , playing loud western music where clients come to drink alcohol, get drunk and dance causing disturbance to the neighboring houses in the locality. In this regard, you have no clearances authorized. Any such instance reported in the future at your bar and restaurant will result in legal action being initiated as well as cancellation of operating licenses by the higher authorities.”

Special Report, What’s The Scene India

Sharanya Nair

Sharanya is a 'writer' and an 'editor'. You know the type. She loves her music too much to share.

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